NIXAR posted on 26-11-2009 03:26 PM

Laut Mati Akan Kering Menjelang 2050. Laut Baru Akan Muncul Di Gurun Ethiopia.

Post Last Edit by NIXAR at 26-11-2009 15:40

Dead Sea needs world help to stay alive
AFP

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/afp/20091125/capt.photo_1259075737454-1-0.jpg?x=213&y=142&xc=1&yc=1&wc=410&hc=273&q=85&sig=ajRGS0NwBJFuLpuhKN09Pw--
Dead Sea needs world help to stay alive AFP/File 每 Jordanians stand in a semi-deserted field near the Dead Sea south of Amman on November 9. The Dead Sea #
by Ahmad Khatib Ahmad Khatib 每 Wed Nov 25, 12:28 pm ET

GHOR HADITHA, Jordan (AFP) 每 The Dead Sea may soon shrink to a lifeless pond as Middle East political strife blocks vital measures needed to halt the decay of the world's lowest and saltiest body of water, experts say.

The surface level is plunging by a metre (three feet) a year and nothing has yet been done to reverse the decline because of a lack of political cooperation as a result of the Arab-Israeli conflict.

The shoreline has receded by more than a kilometre (around a mile) in some places and the world-famous lake, a key tourism destination renowned for the beneficial effect of its minerals, could dry out by 2050, according to some calculations.

"It might be confined into a small pond. It is likely to happen and this is extremely serious. Nobody is doing anything now to save it," said water expert Dureid Mahasneh, a former Jordan Valley Authority chief.

"Saving the Dead Sea is a regional issue, and if you take the heritage, environmental and historical importance, or even the geographical importance, it is an international issue."

Landlocked between Jordan, Israel and the West Bank, the Dead Sea is rapidly vanishing because water which previously flowed into the lake is being diverted and also extracted to service industry and agriculture.

Jordan decided in September to go it alone and build a two-billion-dollar pipeline from the Red Sea to start refilling the Dead Sea without help from proposed partners Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

However, that project is controversial and Mahasneh stressed that Jordan alone is not capable of solving the Dead Sea's problems.

The degradation began in the 1960s when Israel, Jordan and Syria began to divert water from the Jordan River, the Dead Sea's main supplier.

For decades, the three neighbouring countries have taken around 95 percent of the river's flow for agricultural and industrial use. Israel alone diverts more than 60 percent of the river.

The impact on the Dead Sea has been compounded by a drop in groundwater levels as rain water from surrounding mountains dissolved salt deposits that had previously plugged access to underground caverns.

Industrial operations around the shores of the lake also contribute to its problems.

Both Israel and Jordan have set up massive evaporation pools to vaporise Dead Sea water for the production of phosphate, while five-star hotels have sprung up along its shores, where tourists flock for the curative powers of the sea mud and minerals.

The salty lake is currently 67 kilometres (42 miles) long and 18 kilometres (11 miles) wide.

The top of the water was already 395 metres (1,303 feet) under global sea level in the 1960s but the drying out has lowered the surface further to minus 422 metres (1,392 feet), according to Friends of the Earth Middle East (FoEME).

Mahasneh says climate change is aggravating the crisis. "Climate change affected everything," he said. "It's an umbrella for many problems, including short rainfall.

"Nothing is being seriously done to tackle climate change. Sustainable and integrated solutions are needed."

The World Bank has funded a two-year study of the plan for a pipeline from the Red Sea to replenish the Dead Sea.

The project, agreed in outline by Israel, the Palestinian Authority and Jordan in 2005, aims to channel two billion cubic metres (70 billion cubic feet) of water a year via a 200-kilometre (120-mile) canal to produce fresh water and generate electricity as well as raise the Dead Sea.

But some environmentalists say the scheme could harm the Dead Sea further by changing its unique chemistry by introducing Red Sea water.

"We are dealing with at least two sensitive and different ecosystems: the Dead Sea and the Red Sea. We also need to keep an open mind about other possible alternatives," said Munqeth Mehyar, FoEME chair.

Mahasneh supports the plan, saying: "The Dead-Red project is like a salvage plan -- there is no other option. But it won't be an easy task for political and economic reasons."

Jordan's Environment Minister Khaled Irani said: "Let's wait and see the results of the study of the environmental impact."

"We might not go ahead with the project if it is going to create a major mess with the ecosystem, but if we can bring water to the Dead Sea and maintain the same ecological quality of the Dead Sea, why not?"

Friends of the Earth's Mehyar believes saving the Jordan River is key to the Dead Sea.

The waterway is under severe ecological strain because large amounts of raw sewage gush untreated at various locations into the relative trickle left after the diversion of most of the Jordan River.

During the past 50 years, the river's annual flow has dropped from more than 1.3 billion cubic metres (46 billion cubic feet) to around 70 million cubic metres (around 2.5 billion cubic feet), according to FoEME.

"We are working hard to push for rehabilitating the Jordan River by increasing and maintaining its flow in order to save it and save the Dead Sea," Mehyar said.

"The Dead Sea is in danger and that's for sure. I can't claim that we can prevent the level of the Dead Sea from dropping more, but I think we can control the problem and cooperation from all sides is a must."

Most of the springs in the Jordan Valley which flow directly into the Dead Sea are currently dammed, according to water experts.

Jordan, where the population of around six million is expanding by 3.5 percent a year, is a largely desert country that depends greatly on rainfall. It needs every drop of water to meet domestic, agricultural and industrial requirements.

The tiny kingdom, which forecasts it will need 1.6 billion cubic metres (56 billion cubic metres) of water a year by 2015, is one of the 10 driest countries in the world, with desert covering 92 percent of its territory.

"We need to make sure that there is always running water flowing into the Dead Sea," Irani said.

"The Dead Sea is unique in many aspects, not only for Jordan, but also for the Israelis and Palestinians."

One side effect of the lake's falling water volumes is the appearance of large sinkholes along its shores, creating serious problems for farmers and businesses.

"A sinkhole destroyed my farm 10 years ago and forced me to move and work for other farmers," said Izzat Khanazreh, 42, as he puffed on a cigarette, his face tanned by working long hours under a hot sun.

He used to grow vegetables in his farm in Ghor Haditha in the southern Jordan Valley, a bare and sun-baked area around the Dead Sea.

"Nobody compensated me for my loss. My land was full of cracks and it was impossible to do anything about it," said Khanazreh, standing beside a sinkhole about 20 metres (65 feet) wide and 40 metres (130 feet) deep.

There are an estimated 100 sinkholes in Ghor Haditha alone. They can open up at any time and swallow up everything above ground like a devastating earthquake.

"These sinkholes are time bombs. They can appear any time and eat everything up," said Fathi Huweimer, a field researcher with FoEME.

"Farmers do not feel secure and are anticipating more trouble. This problem is because of the degradation of the Dead Sea."

A factory for Dead Sea products in the area has had to relocate after a large sinkhole appeared beneath it, threatening the lives of more than 60 workers, Huweimer said.

Irani said Jordan will highlight the Dead Sea's problems at the Copenhagen summit on climate change next month.

"We will raise those issues in Copenhagen and say that Jordan is heavily affected and urge developed countries to allocate more resources to contribute to saving the Dead Sea," he said.

The Dead Sea may soon shrink to a lifeless pond as Middle East political strife blocks vital measures needed to halt the decay of the world's lowest and saltiest body of water. Environmentalists will plead for help at the Copenhagen summit on climate talks next month. Duration: 01:54


:funk: :funk:

silverstar333 posted on 26-11-2009 03:28 PM

;Plps ni ada ke plak filem kisah "2050"???

Kat board lg satu duk sibuk kata 2012 dh kiamat??

Tup2 ni ada pla researc smpai 2050???

;P;P;P

NIXAR posted on 26-11-2009 03:29 PM

6OeXK4H_nj0

NIXAR posted on 26-11-2009 03:32 PM

ni bukan research la. ni benda yg jadi la ni. Laut Mati tu makin kering. depa anggarkan ikut kadar sekarang airnya dpt bertahan sampai 2050 je. :D

rienafaiz posted on 26-11-2009 03:33 PM

mcm2 skrg ni kan....
takut plak aku..... dugaan betulll..
cpt2 la bertaubatt

DewaSeks posted on 26-11-2009 03:36 PM

2050 tu kita sumer dah mati insyaallah..jgn risau...:shakehead3:

chintalara posted on 26-11-2009 03:37 PM

sama2 la ambik iktibar di atas segala yg tlah berlaku di muka bumi ini

NIXAR posted on 26-11-2009 03:37 PM

Giant Crack in Africa Will Create a New Ocean
LiveScience.com
livescience.com 每 Mon Nov 2, 5:43 pm ET

A 35-mile rift in the desert of Ethiopia will likely become a new ocean eventually, researchers now confirm.

The crack, 20 feet wide in spots, opened in 2005 and some geologists believed then that it would spawn a new ocean. But that view was controversial, and the rift had not been well studied.

A new study involving an international team of scientists and reported in the journal Geophysical Research Letters finds the processes creating the rift are nearly identical to what goes on at the bottom of oceans, further indication a sea is in the region's future.

The same rift activity is slowly parting the Red Sea, too.

Using newly gathered seismic data from 2005, researchers reconstructed the event to show the rift tore open along its entire 35-mile length in just days. Dabbahu, a volcano at the northern end of the rift, erupted first, then magma pushed up through the middle of the rift area and began "unzipping" the rift in both directions, the researchers explained in a statement today.

"We know that seafloor ridges are created by a similar intrusion of magma into a rift, but we never knew that a huge length of the ridge could break open at once like this," said Cindy Ebinger, professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester and co-author of the study.

The result shows that highly active volcanic boundaries along the edges of tectonic ocean plates may suddenly break apart in large sections, instead of in bits, as the leading theory held. And such sudden large-scale events on land pose a much more serious hazard to populations living near the rift than would several smaller events, Ebinger said.

"The whole point of this study is to learn whether what is happening in Ethiopia is like what is happening at the bottom of the ocean where it's almost impossible for us to go," says Ebinger. "We knew that if we could establish that, then Ethiopia would essentially be a unique and superb ocean-ridge laboratory for us. Because of the unprecedented cross-border collaboration behind this research, we now know that the answer is yes, it is analogous."

The African and Arabian plates meet in the remote Afar desert of Northern Ethiopia and have been spreading apart in a rifting process - at a speed of less than 1 inch per year - for the past 30 million years. This rifting formed the 186-mile Afar depression and the Red Sea. The thinking is that the Red Sea will eventually pour into the new sea in a million years or so. The new ocean would connect to the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, an arm of the Arabian Sea between Yemen on the Arabian Peninsula and Somalia in eastern Africa.

Atalay Ayele, professor at the Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia, led the investigation, gathering seismic data with help from neighboring Eritrea and Ghebrebrhan Ogubazghi, professor at the Eritrea Institute of Technology, and from Yemen with the help of Jamal Sholan of the National Yemen Seismological Observatory Center.

NIXAR posted on 26-11-2009 03:50 PM

hAsJMuyndPQ

newyork posted on 26-11-2009 04:03 PM

..tak sempat rasanya tahun 2050 tu dah nak bernafas.....

apam posted on 26-11-2009 04:05 PM

Err yeke? time tu sape yg perintah m'sia? BN ke PR?

catstitch posted on 26-11-2009 04:07 PM

Err yeke? time tu sape yg perintah m'sia? BN ke PR?
apam Post at 26-11-2009 16:05 http://forum.cari.com.my/images/common/back.gif

pasal laut mati kering
tetiba masuk bab politik plak
ni masalah iklim, geografi dan pemanasan global lah......

catstitch posted on 26-11-2009 04:10 PM

tetiba terasa nk tepek video ni plak
v2y1pE3yn6M

saladin780 posted on 26-11-2009 04:11 PM

Atalay Ayele, professor at the Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia, led the investigation, gathering seismic data with help from neighboring Eritrea and Ghebrebrhan Ogubazghi, professor at the Eritrea Institute of Technology, and from Yemen with the help of Jamal Sholan of the National Yemen Seismological Observatory Center

wow hebat gak universiti kat addis ababa ni:loveliness:

anya8797 posted on 26-11-2009 04:12 PM

anya rasa this is bound to happen....
kadar kandungan garam yang sangat tinggi pun membantu dehidrasi is it not?.....
it is said....kalau berenang kat laut mati ni...boleh floating kan.....sebab kandungan garam yang sangat tinggi......

catstitch posted on 26-11-2009 04:14 PM

anya rasa this is bound to happen....
kadar kandungan garam yang sangat tinggi pun membantu dehidrasi is it not?.....
it is said....kalau berenang kat laut mati ni...boleh floating kan.....sebab kan ...
anya8797 Post at 26-11-2009 16:12 http://forum.cari.com.my/images/common/back.gif

sbb tu ramai yg kesana nk sembuhkan penyakit dek kerana kandungan garam yg tinnggi tu utk menyembuhkan penyakit mcm kudis2

nashrudean posted on 26-11-2009 04:14 PM

Ye ke...kaum2 sodom yg terbalik tu agak2 ada chance tak nak timbul sebelum laut tu kering terus?

NIXAR posted on 26-11-2009 04:32 PM

dgn munculnya laut baru di Afrika adakah masalah air dan kebuluran akan berkurangan? :)

anya8797 posted on 26-11-2009 04:35 PM



sbb tu ramai yg kesana nk sembuhkan penyakit dek kerana kandungan garam yg tinnggi tu utk menyembuhkan penyakit mcm kudis2
catstitch Post at 26-11-2009 16:14 http://mforum6.cari.com.my/images/common/back.gif

Oo..yelah kan cat .....
memang kalau kudis..orang kata mandi laut cepat baik ye....
lagi2 pulak very high content of natrium chloride macam nih......

nashrudean posted on 26-11-2009 04:38 PM

17# nashrudean

Air masin ni boleh ke nak siram pokok atau suburkan tanah?
Masalah kebuluran tetap x sama...kalu la air tu x masin msti subur la pdg pasir situ...

NIXAR posted on 26-11-2009 04:45 PM

air laut boleh disuling kan. :)

cmf_premierleag posted on 26-11-2009 05:01 PM

Err yeke? time tu sape yg perintah m'sia? BN ke PR?
apam Post at 26-11-2009 16:05 http://mforum3.cari.com.my/images/common/back.gif

maybe pd waktu itu, PR & BN dah berkubur tggl sejarah shj
so akan ada satu parti baru
Parti Tupperware:lol:

cm_gagahperkasa posted on 26-11-2009 05:34 PM

nama pun laut Mati
cuba tukar nama laut Hidup

anya8797 posted on 26-11-2009 05:36 PM

nama pun laut Mati
cuba tukar nama laut Hidup
cm_gagahperkasa Post at 26-11-2009 17:34 http://mforum6.cari.com.my/images/common/back.gif

tegelak anya pun...betul jugak ye.......it's all in the name....;P

bintang posted on 26-11-2009 06:08 PM

Lum kiamat lagi la tahun 2012 neh... :ohmy3:

Apa kata geng kicap bani tamim, Bang NIX :laugh3:
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